New Database: Art and Architecture in Video

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The Alexander Street Press collection, Art and Architecture in Video, delivers 500+ hours of documentaries and interviews illustrating the theory and practice of a variety of art forms and providing the context necessary for critical analysis. Ideal for both undergraduate and graduate courses, the works within this collection offer a dynamic tool to enhance understanding of visual media.
This collection is available to unlimited users via networked computers on the MSU campus in Bozeman and via the proxy server: . Please direct questions or comments to Kirsten Ostergaard, Electronic Resources & Discovery Services Librarian, kirsten.ostergaard (at) montana.edu.

Trial Database: SAGE Business Cases

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A trial of SAGE Business Cases is available through 6/13/16.

SAGE Business Cases provides access to authoritative cases in global business.  Cases are designed to suit a range of academic uses from short vignettes to narrative long form, written using both field research and publicly available sources. Topics include: Marketing, Operations Management, Small Business & Entrepreneurship, International Business, Human Resource Management, and more.

This resource is available to unlimited users via networked computers on the MSU campus in Bozeman and via the proxy server at http://guides.lib.montana.edu/business-cases. Please direct questions or comments to Kirsten Ostergaard, Electronic Resources & Discovery Services Librarian, kirsten.ostergaard (at) montana.edu.

Trial Database: Naxos Music Library

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A trial of Naxos Music Library is available through May 30, 2016. Naxos Music Library is a comprehensive classical music library available online. In conjunction with hundreds of top music labels, it contains titles spanning medieval music to modern, jazz, electronic, world music, pop, rock, and more, making it an unrivaled streaming music library.

Noteworthy Features:

  • Over 1.6 million tracks from more than 112,000 albums and over 750 labels, with hundreds of new CDs added weekly.
  • Customizable playlists: Professors can create and edit playlists of exam pieces and extracurricular listening for their students. Students can create their own private playlists as well.
  • Search by keyword, composer, genre, label, artist, duration, period, and more using the Advanced Search feature.
  • Opera libretti and synopses in up to 5 languages
  • Music glossary and pronunciation guide
  • Analyses of major classical works by Naxos’ team of musicologists

This resource is available via networked computers on the MSU campus in Bozeman and via the proxy server at http://guides.lib.montana.edu/nml. Please direct questions or comments to Kirsten Ostergaard, Electronic Resources & Discovery Services Librarian, kirsten.ostergaard (at) montana.edu.

New Database: Montana Newspapers

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Montana Newspapers is a freely accessible, full-text searchable database and website provided by the Montana Historical Society. This collection  includes more than 352,000 pages from 44 Montana newspapers dated 1885-2014.​ The content in Montana Newspapers was previously available on the Montana Memory Project. The new site, designed specifically for digitized newspapers, offers more effective search, browse, and display of content.

Montana Newspapers is freely available at montananewspapers.org and on the MSU Library website at http://www.lib.montana.edu/resources/item/680.

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

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Less than 10% of Wikipedia contributors identify as female.

Let’s change that.

MSU Library

Thursday, March 31

Noon-5pm

We will provide: tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, reference materials, refreshments, and laptops. Bring ideas for Wikipedia entries that need updating or creation. Even if you’re editing-averse, we urge you to stop by to show your support. We invite people of all gender identities and expressions, particularly transgender, cis-gender, and gender non-conforming women, to participate.

Links

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Meetup Page

MSU Art + Feminism Wikipedia Meetup Page

Train-the-Trainer

Lesson Plan

Wikipedia Editing Cheat Sheet

References and Citations

 

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New Database: World’s Fairs

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From the Eiffel Tower and the Space Needle to the invention of television, chewing gum and hot dogs, world’s fairs have shaped our world. Collating material from archives around the world, this resource offers a unique insight into the phenomenon of international expositions by presenting official records, monographs, personal accounts and ephemera for more than 200 fairs together for the first time. From the earliest plans to public reception and the legacy that remains, the impact of these global events can be examined in a comprehensive context.


 

World’s fairs are a truly interdisciplinary subject. They engage topics as diverse as globalization and city planning to visual culture, bubble-gum and a global public, and this resource aims to reflect this breadth by including as wide a range of material types as possible. From the governmental records of early financial appeals and delicate international diplomacy, minutes and correspondence of fair committees and plans and design concepts, to contemporary ephemera (tickets, pamphlets, posters), personal accounts and official guidebooks; a huge range of angles of enquiry are made possible.

The first fair represented in this resource is what many consider the first world’s fair, the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations at the Crystal Palace in London, 1851. The latest case study is Montreal’s Expo 1967, but there are documents as recent as Milan’s (successful) bid to host Expo 2015. The largest concentration of documents relate to fairs from the late Victorian-early Edwardian era of 1880-1920; the ‘golden age’ of expositions when neighboring cities raced to outdo each other – sometimes hosting rival fairs in the same year.

While there are documents for host nations from every continent, the historical focus of international expositions (and therefore this resource) is Northern European, North American and – in the twentieth century in particular – East Asian. Throughout the centuries, however, countries from all over the world participated in world’s fairs not only as displayed but as active displayers, and can be discovered in this resource.

World’s Fairs is available to unlimited users via networked computers on the MSU campus in Bozeman and via the proxy server: http://www.lib.montana.edu/resources/item/678.  Please direct questions or comments to Kirsten Ostergaard, Electronic Resources & Discovery Services Librarian, kirsten.ostergaard (at) montana.edu.

New Database: American Indian Histories and Cultures

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American Indian Histories and Cultures presents a unique insight into interactions between American Indians and Europeans from their earliest contact, continuing through the turbulence of the American Civil War, the ongoing repercussions of government legislation, right up to the civil rights movement of the mid- to late-twentieth century. This resource contains material from the Newberry Library’s extensive Edward E. Ayer Collection; one of the strongest archival collections on American Indian history in the world. Adam Matthew Digital aimed to cover the important themes and time periods in American Indian history and to provide a rich resource for both in depth research and for teaching. This collection of material specifically focuses on American Indian history in the United States, Canada and Mexico.

The American Indian Histories & Cultures collection is considered a companion piece to The American West, a database already included in the MSU Library collection, and is fully cross-searchable. Users can find helpful links to expand their searches across both collections as well as links to The American West document list throughout the site.

American Indian Histories and Cultures is available to unlimited users via networked computers on the MSU campus in Bozeman and via the proxy server: http://www.lib.montana.edu/resources/item/679.  Please direct questions or comments to Kirsten Ostergaard, Electronic Resources & Discovery Services Librarian, kirsten.ostergaard (at) montana.edu.