WriteNight Fall 2016

The MSU Writing Center and MSU Library have once again teamed up to bring you WriteNight on Wednesday, November 16 from 4 – 7 p.m. on the 1st floor of the MSU Library.

Work with writinwritenightfall2016g tutors, librarians, and fellow students on any stage of the writing process. Help is available for undergraduate and graduate students. Bring your computers, ideas, and questions for an evening of writing in community!

Help topics include:
Experimenting, Brainstorming, Researching, Organizing, Revising, Focusing, Editing,Citing

 
Coffee coupons to the Brewed Awakening will be given to participants.

Head into the final weeks of the semester on the right foot by getting help with those papers and projects from writing experts and librarians. We’re here to help you!

World Usability Day at your Library

World Usability Day (WUD) is Thursday, November 10. We want to hear from you! Contribute to a conversation about sustainability at Montana State University.

  • Who: You!
  • What: World Usability Day
  • When: Thursday, November 10
  • Where: Throughout the Library
  • How: Contribute your thoughts and experiences on the large poster sheets that will be placed throughout the library on November 10
  • Why: To share your sustainability experiences on campus

The World Usability website describes the event as a way to celebrate “successful user experience, bringing awareness to holistic solutions to create a better world.” The 2016 theme is Green UX, so join the conversation about sustainability at MSU!

Counting sheep in Doig country

A curious lamb examines some recording gear. Photo by Jeff Rice.

A curious lamb examines some recording gear. Photo by Jeff Rice.

The library celebrates the launch of the Ivan Doig Archive later this month and the Acoustic Atlas is pairing audio recordings with some of the collection’s digital content. This summer we have gathered everything from the sounds of birds and coyotes to haying equipment, all relating to the late author’s novels and other writings.

As the summer comes to a close, we have saved the best for last. Our collection wouldn’t be complete without a nod to that staple of Montana ranching, the sheep.

Sheep ranching was central to Doig’s life and stories. His father and his Scottish relatives herded sheep across the high meadows around White Sulphur Springs, and for a while at least, central Montana was wild and woolly.

“All the places I liked best had the sounds and smells and feels which came one way or another from the herds and flocks out on the leathered slope of grassland,” Doig wrote in his memoir This House of Sky.

When I visited White Sulphur Springs this summer, I assumed that finding sheep would be the least of my worries. I half expected the town to be overrun with them.

Surprisingly, there are actually few sheep left in the area. For years, cattle have been more profitable and far more popular. One small flock of sheep stood on the edge of town just off the highway, but I was told that if I wanted to find a larger herd I would need to go about 30 miles down the road. That meant the Bair Ranch near Martinsdale.

Luck was with me when I called there. “Sure,” they said. “We’re going to be driving about 3000 sheep up the road to a new pasture tomorrow.” A good sheep drive doesn’t happen every day, even in Montana, so I jumped at the opportunity.

I showed up at 5:30 AM just as the herders were arriving. Many of them were from Argentina and spoke mostly Spanish. Off-road vehicles took the place of horses, but other than that there seemed to be little difference between modern sheep herding and Doig’s era. The foreman was expecting my arrival and directed me to set up my microphone near a gate in the fence — and to stay out of the way.

There is little stopping a stampede of sheep. “In their best of times sheep go through life in a near panic,” Doig once wrote. But the herders and their dogs knew what they were doing. The sheep crossed onto the road in a surprisingly orderly fashion. You could hear their bleating from more than a mile away as they moved down the highway toward their new pasture. Take a listen and see if you can count the number of hooves and divide by four.

Missing your furry friends? Come to the Library on Wednesday, August, 31 from 1 – 4 p.m. to visit with cuddly canines from Intermountain Therapy Animals. This Paws to de-Stress preview is part of MSU Debut and offers a sneak peek at part of the Library’s efforts to help manage stress at the end of the semester.WebCarousel_2016_MSUDebut

NPR features Acoustic Atlas Yellowstone recordings

masthead-here-and-nowThe NPR program Here and Now interviewed Acoustic Atlas audio producer Jennifer Jerrett last week about some of the sounds she is recording in Yellowstone National Park. Jennifer is recording in Yellowstone as part of a cooperative agreement between the MSU Library and the Park Service.

Sounds included an incredible grizzly bear roar, cougar calls, and wildfire recordings, among several others soon to be available on the Acoustic Atlas. Here and Now has been visiting parks across the country as part of a series on the 100th anniversary of the establishment of the National Park Service.

Listen to the entire interview on Hear and Now’s webpage.