Acoustic Atlas at the State Fair

Ivan Doig in Montana. Photo courtesy of Carol Doig.

Ivan Doig in Montana. Photo courtesy of Carol Doig.

Audio recordings from the Acoustic Atlas will be featured at the Big Sky Country State Fair in Bozeman from July 19 – 23. Soundscapes of rodeo events, livestock and the natural environment will accompany an MSU Library exhibit celebrating the life and work of the late novelist Ivan Doig.

In 2016, the Acoustic Atlas conducted several recording trips tracing locations featured in Doig’s writings as part of the library’s new Ivan Doig archive. Doig was raised in Montana and spent much of his life writing about his experiences. He wrote more than 16 books of fiction and non-fiction.

You can read more about the Doig exhibit in an article published last May in the Bozeman Daily Chronicle. 

Sounds of the prairie

A windy morning on the Montana prairie. Photo by Jeff Rice.

A windy morning on the Montana prairie. Photo by Jeff Rice.

The library’s Acoustic Atlas just returned from an incredible recording trip to the American Prairie Reserve in north-central Montana.

If you haven’t heard of the American Prairie Reserve, it is part of an ambitious effort to preserve a huge portion of Montana’s vanishing grasslands. All told, its organizers hope to stitch together about three million acres of prime prairie habitat. If successful, they will create the largest nature reserve in the continental United States — plenty of space for these coyotes (see recording below) calling under the stars last Sunday at about 2:00 AM.

 

Sounds for new film at Sundance

Walking Out promotional still

Walking Out promotional still

If you had a chance to see the movie Walking Out at the Sundance Film Festival last week, you would have 1. been pretty lucky (the tickets were sold out far in advance), and 2. heard an incredibly rich mix of audio recordings from Montana’s backcountry. We’re proud to say that the library’s Acoustic Atlas contributed many of those recordings to the film.

Walking Out was shot mostly outdoors near Montana’s Crazy Mountains, and the filmmakers wanted the right sounds to match their epic cinematography. They knew that by coming to us, they would not only get great sounds, but also recordings of the actual places and species in their movie.

The movie adapts David Quammen’s short story of the same name and is written and directed by Montana filmmakers Alex and Andrew Smith. It’s the story of a father and son hunting trip that turns into a struggle for survival. Variety called it a “lyrical and moving exploration of both the Montana backwoods and the human soul.”

I was able to visit Park City for a showing of the movie, and it was a thrill to see it all come together in the theater. Even though the movie is a work of fiction, those elk bugles and bird calls weren’t recorded on a Hollywood sound stage. The sounds are as real as it gets.

Keep an eye out for the movie later this year. Want to hear some of the sounds? Visit acousticatlas.org.

Outside the Redstone Theater in Park City

Outside the Redstone Theater in Park City

Counting sheep in Doig country

A curious lamb examines some recording gear. Photo by Jeff Rice.

A curious lamb examines some recording gear. Photo by Jeff Rice.

The library celebrates the launch of the Ivan Doig Archive later this month and the Acoustic Atlas is pairing audio recordings with some of the collection’s digital content. This summer we have gathered everything from the sounds of birds and coyotes to haying equipment, all relating to the late author’s novels and other writings.

As the summer comes to a close, we have saved the best for last. Our collection wouldn’t be complete without a nod to that staple of Montana ranching, the sheep.

Sheep ranching was central to Doig’s life and stories. His father and his Scottish relatives herded sheep across the high meadows around White Sulphur Springs, and for a while at least, central Montana was wild and woolly.

“All the places I liked best had the sounds and smells and feels which came one way or another from the herds and flocks out on the leathered slope of grassland,” Doig wrote in his memoir This House of Sky.

When I visited White Sulphur Springs this summer, I assumed that finding sheep would be the least of my worries. I half expected the town to be overrun with them.

Surprisingly, there are actually few sheep left in the area. For years, cattle have been more profitable and far more popular. One small flock of sheep stood on the edge of town just off the highway, but I was told that if I wanted to find a larger herd I would need to go about 30 miles down the road. That meant the Bair Ranch near Martinsdale.

Luck was with me when I called there. “Sure,” they said. “We’re going to be driving about 3000 sheep up the road to a new pasture tomorrow.” A good sheep drive doesn’t happen every day, even in Montana, so I jumped at the opportunity.

I showed up at 5:30 AM just as the herders were arriving. Many of them were from Argentina and spoke mostly Spanish. Off-road vehicles took the place of horses, but other than that there seemed to be little difference between modern sheep herding and Doig’s era. The foreman was expecting my arrival and directed me to set up my microphone near a gate in the fence — and to stay out of the way.

There is little stopping a stampede of sheep. “In their best of times sheep go through life in a near panic,” Doig once wrote. But the herders and their dogs knew what they were doing. The sheep crossed onto the road in a surprisingly orderly fashion. You could hear their bleating from more than a mile away as they moved down the highway toward their new pasture. Take a listen and see if you can count the number of hooves and divide by four.

NPR features Acoustic Atlas Yellowstone recordings

masthead-here-and-nowThe NPR program Here and Now interviewed Acoustic Atlas audio producer Jennifer Jerrett last week about some of the sounds she is recording in Yellowstone National Park. Jennifer is recording in Yellowstone as part of a cooperative agreement between the MSU Library and the Park Service.

Sounds included an incredible grizzly bear roar, cougar calls, and wildfire recordings, among several others soon to be available on the Acoustic Atlas. Here and Now has been visiting parks across the country as part of a series on the 100th anniversary of the establishment of the National Park Service.

Listen to the entire interview on Hear and Now’s webpage.

Summer road trip: crashing surf in Santa Cruz

Surfers in Santa Cruz, California. Photo by Jeff Rice.

Surfers in Santa Cruz, California. Photo by Jeff Rice.

Since the 1970s, recordings of ocean waves have been the stock and trade of nature sound recordists and new age musicians. This is due in large part to the success of one man named Irv Teibel, who all but invented the hippie soundscape. He recorded ocean waves, birds and soothing streams and packaged them as a groovy “Decongestant For the Mind,” perfect for massage therapists and California dreamers.

Even if you have never heard of Irv Teibel, you know his influence. You may have even seen his Environments series in your local thrift store record bin. His first album included the “Psychologically Ultimate Seashore” that was marketed, brilliantly, as “The Future of Music.”

In fact, Teibel’s album did have a lot in common with music. It was a fabrication of editing and mixing that included, yes, some real ocean sounds (from New York’s Brighton Beach), but also computer-enhanced white noise that created something that Teibel felt was even more authentic. (You can read an excellent profile of Teibel in Atlas Obscura.) Whatever it was, it struck a chord and Teibel sold millions of copies from the series. Now many people assume that what they heard on those albums was an accurate reflection of the natural environment.

That can be a little frustrating. When I make recordings, many people assume I am out to capture the soothing, relaxing sounds of the environment. Some of the sounds on the library’s Acoustic Atlas are actually pretty relaxing, but that’s not our goal. We’re trying to capture what places and animals really sound like, which can be surprising. Frogs don’t always go ribbit, birds aren’t always mellifluous and oceans don’t always wash gently against the shore.

That said, I felt the presence of Teibel over the weekend as I trekked out with my microphone to Natural Bridges State Beach in the hippie enclave of Santa Cruz, California. I have recorded ocean waves at many different beaches across the West and down into Mexico. They all sound a little different. Some sound radically different. It depends on the geology of the beach, the weather conditions and many other factors. In this case, the medium-sized waves pounded the sand in a nice, low frequency pulse of Teibel-esque white noise.

It has always struck me as odd that ocean waves are soothing to people. They can be quite loud, and create an insistent wall of noise that is hard to write off as mellow background pablum. Waves are intense and crash on the shore. Given the chance, they might pick you up and sweep you out to sea. But I admit that I too find them calming. I don’t know why that is, but I’m a sucker for the sound of waves just as much as anyone. Feel free to get out your incense and scented candles and take a listen.

Summer road trip: Olympic Marmot

The Olympic marmot is one of three marmot species found in the United States. It is endemic to Olympic National Park in Washington, where this particular one was recorded today for the library’s Acoustic Atlas.

Montana residents might be more familiar with the yellow-bellied marmot. It inhabits local alpine areas like Bridger Bowl Ski Resort, where we captured a 2014 recording. It also makes a snappy ringtone.

In search of English Creek

A sign for Dupuyer Creek in Dupuyer, Montana. Photo by Jeff Rice.

A sign for Dupuyer Creek in Dupuyer, Montana. Photo by Jeff Rice.

Ivan Doig’s second novel English Creek introduces one of Doig’s best-known literary creations, the McCaskill family. Its main character, Jick McCaskill, is a 14-year-old boy negotiating small-town life in Depression-era Montana, and English Creek is his coming of age story. Jick and the McCaskill’s are loosely based on Doig’s memories of his own family and the people he knew while growing up along Montana’s Rocky Mountain Front.

As much as the book is a work of fiction, the places and people in it ring true. English Creek itself winds through fictional composites of the small towns where Doig lived much of his life through high school. “Some of the geography is actual,” writes Doig in the book’s Acknowledgements. “I’m afraid, though, that anyone who attempts to sort the real from the imagined in this book is in for confusion.”

In a way, that has been my job this summer—sorting the real from the imagined in some of Doig’s work. I have been visiting several of the places that Doig wrote about, and trying to capture a feel for them. In the case of the eponymous English Creek, Doig would not necessarily say that it was a real place on the map, but if it were (he has implied), the nearest thing to it would be Dupuyer Creek. That creek runs right through the town of Dupuyer, where I visited earlier this month.

Bear spray is recommended for those traveling along the rocky Mountain front. Photo by Jeff Rice.

Bear spray is recommended for those hiking along the Rocky Mountain Front. Photo by Jeff Rice.

One thing about this creek, however, is very different from the one described in the novel, and from the place experienced by Doig as well. Over the past 20 or so years, some new residents have arrived. Grizzly bears have been expanding their range and now regularly show up in and around the town and other areas along the mountains and prairies. I was told by local residents that the bears like to follow the creek bottoms and will often nap in the heavy brush by the water during hot afternoons. I was advised to keep an eye out and carry bear spray, even when recording the creek in the center of town.

Take a listen to Dupuyer Creek (AKA English Creek) in the recording below. But don’t get too comfortable.

Meadowlark song

The writer Ivan Doig was a keen observer of the natural environment, especially the birds of the West. “None of us spoke while the songs of the birds poured undiluted,” remembers a character in Doig’s novel Ride with Me, Mariah Montana. It was a deference shared by the author, who was an avid birdwatcher.

This summer, the Acoustic Atlas is traveling to some of the places that influenced Doig, and we are capturing recordings of many of his favorite birds. The recordings will become part of the library’s collection of Doig’s papers, now being digitized for presentation online this fall.

“I suppose we were afraid the spate of loveliest sound would vanish if we broke it with so much as a whisper,” Doig wrote in the novel. “But after a bit came the realization that the music of birds formed a natural part of this place, constant as the glorious grass that made feathered life thrive.”

One such constant is the Western meadowlark. We hope you will enjoy this recording of a solitary bird near Ringling, Montana just outside of White Sulphur Springs where Doig spent his early childhood years. (Special thanks to BirdNote for inspiring this blog.)