Design a new donor Bookplate for the MSU Library!

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Design your mark on MSU

The MSU Library invites all students to enter a contest to design a new donor bookplate. This is a chance for you to design a functional piece of art that will live on well into the future of the library’s collection.

The Library’s bookplate personally acknowledges donors and the family members or friends in whose name they make a donation to support book purchases. The library has had several bookplate designs. Many featured local scenery such as the Bridger Mounts and the “M.”

Your design may continue this tradition or propose something entirely new.

Design your mark on MSU: Create a new bookplate for the Library!

Contest Webpage: http://www.lib.montana.edu/bookplate-contest/

 

About Ex Libris, a.k.a., the bookplate

The bookplate, originally known as ex libris, is a labels adhered to the inside front cover of a book that identify the book’s owner.

For centuries, bookplates have been more than mere labels. Indeed, ex libris is an enduring miniature art form practiced since the 15th century. Many distinguished artists have contributed to the genre; Albrecht Durer, Marc Chagall, M.C. Escher are just a few. Contemporary artists continue the tradition and bring fresh interpretations to the art form.

Learn more about ex libris design: http://www.bookplate.org/page/about-ex-libris

World Usability Day at your Library

World Usability Day (WUD) is Thursday, November 10. We want to hear from you! Contribute to a conversation about sustainability at Montana State University.

  • Who: You!
  • What: World Usability Day
  • When: Thursday, November 10
  • Where: Throughout the Library
  • How: Contribute your thoughts and experiences on the large poster sheets that will be placed throughout the library on November 10
  • Why: To share your sustainability experiences on campus

The World Usability website describes the event as a way to celebrate “successful user experience, bringing awareness to holistic solutions to create a better world.” The 2016 theme is Green UX, so join the conversation about sustainability at MSU!

Missing your furry friends? Come to the Library on Wednesday, August, 31 from 1 – 4 p.m. to visit with cuddly canines from Intermountain Therapy Animals. This Paws to de-Stress preview is part of MSU Debut and offers a sneak peek at part of the Library’s efforts to help manage stress at the end of the semester.WebCarousel_2016_MSUDebut

Specialty Printing Service Changes

The Borrow Desk has a new way of offering large format printing! In order to provide you a more consistent and effective printing experience, we have redesigned our Specialty Printing Services.

What are the changes?

  1. If you need a poster or other large format print job, submit an order form at the Borrow Desk.
  2. Designated staff will print the job to your specifications.
  3. We will let you know when the job is ready.
    • All jobs will be completed within two working days.
  4. Pickup your print job, and pay at the Borrow Desk.

Thanks for your patience while we work to continue improving specialty printing services!

Remember, these changes apply to large format, specialty printing only. The standard black and white and color printing services throughout the library will remain the same.Specialty Printing Web Banner, draft

Long Time Coming

Asking people to raise their own taxes is a tough sell. Just ask our local county government how easy it was to get the money to build a new jail a few year back, and how easy it is now to get voters to approve a new “Law and Justice” center.

But imagine how difficult it must have been to raise taxes for a new library while the entire world was battling fascism in the 1940s. At a time when school kids were collecting scrap metal and newspapers, and adults were continually bombarded with solicitations to purchase war bonds, how could anyone have entertained the notion that a new tax to build a library would be acceptable? Only an eternal optimist, or an incredibly dedicated librarian, that’s who.

Meet Lois Payson, perhaps the most pie-eyed optimist who ever worked for our library. Born in Laramie, Wyoming on Christmas Day, 1895, Lois earned two bachelor’s degrees; one in Botany from the University of Wyoming loisand another in Library Science from the University of Illinois. She first came to work at Montana State College as assistant librarian in 1928, but she resigned in 1930 to work at the United States Department of Agriculture library in Washington, D.C. Lois returned to us in 1933 when she became the college librarian, a position she held until she went on to run the library at Yosemite National Park in 1947. She retired in Bozeman in 1956 and died in 1970.

But Lois Payson never worked in the Montana State College library building, and for good reason: we didn’t HAVE a library building in the 1930s and 40s. Books and reading facilities continued to be available in Montana Hall during those decades, sharing space with stuffed birds (and perhaps a few stuffed college administrators, too.) But Lois could see our hres-parc-000494college’s future clearly, and she knew that we had outgrown the space allocated to the library almost as soon as she took the job. That’s why she headed up a Building Committee that in 1939 issued a carefully researched report outlining the need, and worked tirelessly to get Referendum Measure No. 45 placed on the Montana election ballot of 1942. The measure, that would have allowed for the building of a library, failed that fall by 27,845 votes out of a total 85,173 cast. Not surprising since most people were more concerned with defeating Hitler than putting up a place for books.

However, Lois Payson and her successors never gave up, and less than eight years later Montana State College got its first real library building, a full fifty-seven years after the institution was founded. Lois was able to admire it when she returned to Bozeman, and she lived long enough to witness the addition of what we now call the main building in the mid 1960s. I hope she felt it was worth waiting for.